As the digital-camera market matures, consumers are benefiting from more and better choices in camera size and capability. Before you make your buying decision, you should consider whether you need a ...

If getting the shot is of utmost importance to you, a Canon 1-Series body should be a high-ranking option on your very short shopping list. Canon 1-Series bodies have long represented the pinnacle of camera performance and reliability. Proof of such photographer trust can been seen by simply viewing the gear in use during important-to-the-media events. When heavy media coverage is present, such as at the Olympics, Super Bowl, World Cup, etc., Canon 1-Series cameras will have a very high percentage representation. So much so that Canon pinned their most recent Super Bowl representation figure at over 70%, with most EOS cameras being 1-Series models. By simply watching the sidelines of similar events, it is easy to see the most prominent camera choice of those challenged to capture some of the world's most-widely-valued images.

While the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II was at the referred-to Super Bowl in only very limited numbers (minimally, Peter Reed Miller was using one), its predecessor, the Canon EOS-1D X was a dominant choice. The 1D X had been the best sports/action/media camera Canon (and arguably, anyone) has ever introduced. It was built tough, had an incredible AF system, had a crazy-fast frame rate and delivered excellent image quality.

The 1D X arrived (to those who preordered early) just in time for coverage of the London 2012 Summer Olympics. If the 1D X's performance, including image quality, was good enough for events such as this one, it was likely good enough for your events. The 1D Mark X II arrived in good quantity with considerably more lead time ahead of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics and it is a solid upgrade to the 1D X.

How the camera name is derived: In competition, "1" is usually the spot you want. It is the same in Canon's DSLR lineup: The single digit "1" means top-of-the-line, best available, or as I like to say: "You're-going-to-love-it!" The "D" means "Digital" (yes, there were 1-Series film SLR cameras). The "X" represents a "crossover" that took place, representing the merging of the 1D and the 1Ds product lines. The "X" also initially represented the Roman numeral 10, representing the 10th generation of Canon pro cameras - starting with the F1 of the 70s. While the latter representation no longer works (we're at XI), the eXtreme referral still does. The naming approach Canon often gives to a new version of an existing higher-end model line camera is to add a Mark number reference, a "Mark II" in this case.

Canon EOS-1D X Mark II Review

As the digital-camera market matures, consumers are benefiting from more and better choices in camera size and capability. Before you make your buying decision, you should consider whether you need a ...

If getting the shot is of utmost importance to you, a Canon 1-Series body should be a high-ranking option on your very short shopping list. Canon 1-Series bodies have long represented the pinnacle of camera performance and reliability. Proof of such photographer trust can been seen by simply viewing the gear in use during important-to-the-media events. When heavy media coverage is present, such as at the Olympics, Super Bowl, World Cup, etc., Canon 1-Series cameras will have a very high percentage representation. So much so that Canon pinned their most recent Super Bowl representation figure at over 70%, with most EOS cameras being 1-Series models. By simply watching the sidelines of similar events, it is easy to see the most prominent camera choice of those challenged to capture some of the world's most-widely-valued images.

While the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II was at the referred-to Super Bowl in only very limited numbers (minimally, Peter Reed Miller was using one), its predecessor, the Canon EOS-1D X was a dominant choice. The 1D X had been the best sports/action/media camera Canon (and arguably, anyone) has ever introduced. It was built tough, had an incredible AF system, had a crazy-fast frame rate and delivered excellent image quality.

The 1D X arrived (to those who preordered early) just in time for coverage of the London 2012 Summer Olympics. If the 1D X's performance, including image quality, was good enough for events such as this one, it was likely good enough for your events. The 1D Mark X II arrived in good quantity with considerably more lead time ahead of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics and it is a solid upgrade to the 1D X.

How the camera name is derived: In competition, "1" is usually the spot you want. It is the same in Canon's DSLR lineup: The single digit "1" means top-of-the-line, best available, or as I like to say: "You're-going-to-love-it!" The "D" means "Digital" (yes, there were 1-Series film SLR cameras). The "X" represents a "crossover" that took place, representing the merging of the 1D and the 1Ds product lines. The "X" also initially represented the Roman numeral 10, representing the 10th generation of Canon pro cameras - starting with the F1 of the 70s. While the latter representation no longer works (we're at XI), the eXtreme referral still does. The naming approach Canon often gives to a new version of an existing higher-end model line camera is to add a Mark number reference, a "Mark II" in this case.

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